Store Manager, Carol Kelly (shown third from right), was hired in 1972 and is the current manager today.  She is also pictured above with her co-worker (and daughter) Victoria.  

Store Manager, Carol Kelly (shown third from right), was hired in 1972 and is the current manager today.  She is also pictured above with her co-worker (and daughter) Victoria.  

Seattle's Original Fast Food

Some of the world's most favored companies started in a garage, and Alki Spud Fish and Chips is no exception.  The Seattle favorite, located on West Seattle's historic Alki waterfront, sprouted its roots from a modest wood-clad garage.  Brothers Jack and Frank Alger converted their small garage and started dishing up the restaurant's famous fish and chips in 1935 out of a small takeout window.  Hence, Seattle's first fast food restaurant was born - complete with a "parking lot" where customers could lay their boat sails out to dry. 

The Algers, originally from Vancouver, B.C., were familiar with the English-style fish-and-chip stands and saw the opportunity to start their own version on the city's west side beachfront.  Alki Spud customers have enjoyed the same recipes established by the Algers more than 75 years ago, including fresh seafood hand breaded and battered daily, "Spud" cut fries, and tartar sauce made fresh in-house every day.

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The Simple Facts

  • On an average summer day (June – August), Alki Spud serves approximately 900 orders of fish and 600 pounds of fries.
  • Each year, Alki Spud typically sells 32,000 lbs of fish ( 150,000 entrees), 1,100 extra large dill pickles and 175,000 tartar sauce cups. 
  • Spud General Manager Carol Kelly (third from right in photo) is now in her 38th year at Alki Spud. When she started cutting fries at Spud, she made $1.80/hour. 
  • The first Spud fish and chips cost 10 cents for a cardboard boat stuffed with fries and two pieces of breaded ling cod. We still use the original recipe today, though Pacific True cod is used.
  • There was a time during World War II when Spud nearly had to close because it didn't have enough grease to cook the fish and chips, but West Seattle banded together using some of their ration tickets to buy grease and save Alki Spud.